Tag Archives: Content Creation

6 Best Tips for Creating Evergreen Content

At some point during your research to find better ways to improve the performance of your content, whether it is for a blog, company website, or as part of your overall marketing strategy, you have likely encountered the term “evergreen content.” This is not a new term and has been used for over half a decade to describe content that stays relevant over time. The more staying power your content has in terms of relevance to searchers, the more evergreen it is.

To expand the explanation a bit more, evergreen content is engaging, useful, and topically relevant for an extended period of time. If someone uses a search engine to find information about a specific subject today and a year from now and both receive the same result, that content is evergreen. The longer your content can stay visible in search results and relevant to search queries, the more evergreen it is.

As the internet becomes increasingly saturated with a variety of content pertaining to similar topics, it becomes more important for marketers and content creators to produce content that has the most potential for long-term importance to online searchers and surfers.

Create content for beginners. You might be tempted to think that technically advanced, in-depth content would be more appropriate as a candidate for being evergreen. In reality, the opposite is true. Most of the people who use search engines to find information are relatively new to a particular subject and are expanding their knowledge. The individuals who seek out technical content usually have a source location in mind, and they often avoid search engines unless they are performing a cursory search without a specific data acquisition goal in mind. There are also far more people new to a certain subject using search engines on a regular and recurring basis than there are people who want material on advanced subject matter.

Avoid making assumptions with your phrasing and terminology. Because the majority of your readers will be those who are only now familiarizing themselves with a specific topic, you should anticipate their lack of in-depth knowledge and write accordingly. Technical jargon or industry-specific phrasing should be left out unless absolutely necessary and, if it is necessary, make sure the average reader understands what the words or phrases mean.

Use outbound links cautiously. Many writers who provide online content, especially bloggers, are often tempted to include outbound links to reference and source material. This is usually done to give the reader more information about a subject or establish more authority for facts, figures, and other data provided in the content. Problems can arise, however, when you have included links to external web pages that have shuffled off their mortal (internet) coil and been removed or disabled for one reason or another. A “page not found” error is much worse than not including a link at all.

Strive to be the only source of information for your topic. If competition exists for your content that prevents you from being the only source of information about your subject, you need to make sure your content is the definitive source. One of the key factors in creating evergreen content is that you are publishing something that people will want to read today, tomorrow, and years from now (if possible). This means your content should be the most complete, authoritative, and definitive resource for those who want to know more about the subject.

Focus on one specific subject. The more singular your subject, the more definitive your content can be in terms of delivering the most useful information to your readers. When you try to cover several subjects in one piece of content, the end result is usually a disjointed jumble of thoughts that lack a cohesive connection or strong purpose. When choosing your subject, narrow it down to as finite a point as possible. For example, rather than writing about divorce, you could write about divorce and child custody. Rather than writing about divorce and child custody, you could write about how to help children cope with the divorce and custody process. If your topic is as specific as it can be, this gives you a limited range within which you can write, which means your content will have the best opportunity to become a definitive source of material.

Avoid including information that can “date” your content. Dated content automatically creates a shelf life for the material, meaning it will expire when more updated content becomes available. This includes “top ten” lists of any information for a specific year, data relating to current trends (which are called “current” trends because they, too, have a shelf life), breaking news, future speculation that can be proven wrong, or event-specific content. Undated content remains viable and useful when the following year rolls around or the newest batch of trends makes an appearance.

Now that you know several key tips regarding what makes (or breaks) evergreen content, you may be wondering what type of content performs best in the evergreen arena. Unfortunately, there are no hard and fast rules for the type of content that will always find relevance to a significant audience regardless of the passage of time. Some content formats, however, do tend to find themselves staying relevant and useful long after their author has clicked the “publish” button. This includes:

  • Tutorials and how-to content
  • Historical information and “origin” content
  • Curated resource lists (“top ten” content with long-term relevance)
  • Informational posts or encyclopedic content (“ultimate resource” or “complete guide”)
  • Single FAQ industry-specific content (pick one frequently asked question and thoroughly answer it)

Once you have become more adept at creating content that is designed to be evergreen, you will find it easier to adjust attributes of your writing more toward longevity and relevance over time. As you move forward with the creation of evergreen content, you can even go back over old material to see if anything can be re-purposed and turned into content that can stand the test of time.

The development and growth of a portfolio filled with evergreen content only ensures that your material will continue to appear in search results, providing more traffic, visibility, and popularity for your blog or other online content.

33 Top-Notch Content Writing Tips

When it comes to writing, the content itself can span the bridge from paper to digital without much modification.  A writer is really no different than a content writer, copywriter, online writer, or any other person who puts the proverbial pen to page and creates something with words.

That being said, here are 33 content writing tips to help improve the quality or quantity of your written work:

  1. Know what you are writing about and the key points you want to make before you actually start writing.
  2. Avoid using technical jargon, industry buzzwords, and other “catchy” lingo that most people don’t really understand.  It may sound cool, but if your reader doesn’t get it, you might as well be speaking an alien language.
  3. Determine what response you want from the reader and write with achieving that response in mind.
  4. Begin your content with your conclusion first.  (“Here’s the point!”  And all the other writing is just showing how that point was reached.)
  5. KNOW how people read internet-based content.  It’s much different than reading a book; online readers skim and scan content more than they actually read it.
  6. People make decisions more on emotion than logic, so evoke emotional responses with your writing.
  7. Keep sentences and paragraphs short, and don’t include more than one central concept in each paragraph.
  8. All your writing should be directed at people – your audience.  (Google’s crawlers are NOT your audience.)  You can handle the SEO tasks separately.
  9. Add wit and humor to your writing (where appropriate).  If you can engage your readers by eliciting a response from them (i.e., a chuckle or a laugh), they are more likely to remember you.
  10. Write longer, higher quality pieces rather than short-and-sweet summaries.  Try to aim for 600 to 1,000 words for articles and up to 600 words for blog posts.
  11. Include graphics, embedded videos, and images in your content.
  12. The purpose of most content writing is to answer a question – so make sure your writing is informative and responds to a particular (unspoken) inquiry.
  13. Don’t string together sentences and paragraphs that take up half a page without a break.  Many people speed-skim and they need some kind of visual cue to pull their attention like bullets, lists, sub-headings, etc.
  14. Find YOUR voice and put it into what you’re writing.  No one remembers the writers who had the same, tired tone as a dozen others.  Be as original with your writing as you are in real life.
  15. If you are offering information that is allegedly factual, make sure it is before publishing it.  Include source links where appropriate.
  16. If it isn’t meaningful, don’t write it.  Site visitors dislike fluff as much as marketers, search engines, and analysts do.
  17. Avoid using multimedia at all unless it completely enhances your content and does not detract or distract whatsoever.
  18. Know who your competition is with regard to what you’re writing, and make sure your content is unique from theirs.
  19. Create a headline that screams “read me!”
  20. PROOFREAD YOUR WRITING!  Nothing, seriously, is more annoying to a person searching for authoritative information to come to a site and try to read through content that is littered with spelling, syntax, formatting, and grammatical errors.  How can you be recognized as an “expert” on anything if you don’t even comprehend or communicate with basic English?
  21. Never copy and paste other content, even if it is your own.  If you are borrowing from someone else’s ideas, at least have the decency to rephrase the subject matter so it isn’t an overt piece of plagiarism.
  22. Stay on topic with each piece of content.  Nothing is more frustrating than to try to read something about a particular topic only to have the writing jump all over the board (and be largely useless).
  23. Your content should deliver value and information that is relevant to your readers’ interests.  Don’t create an online brochure…create an online experience.
  24. Don’t make your writing about you, your company, your products, etc.  You are writing FOR your audience so the content should be ABOUT your audience.
  25. Put keywords out of your mind.  If you are actually writing quality content about specific subjects, the keywords will create themselves and get added where they need to be without making a job out of it.
  26. Don’t sit down and start writing unless you are ready to write.  If you are feeling lackluster about writing, it will show through in the quality (or lack thereof) of your content.
  27. If you are planning to be a niche writer, make sure you choose a niche that isn’t already over-saturated with writers of every type imaginable.
  28. Make sure your content is presented in a professional way.  This includes your blog site, website, or other online location where you publish your work.  Keep it clean and crisp, and make sure it looks like something done by someone who knows what they are doing.
  29. Don’t make people’s minds up for them with your content (i.e., telling them what is best for them).  Give examples of why something would be beneficial and let people make up their own minds if they “have” to have it or not.
  30. Write something that “needs” to be shared.
  31. Don’t use “big words” when little ones work just fine.  (This falls in line with the tip to avoid technical jargon, buzzwords, and other vague phrasing.)
  32. Avoid writing about things that you are not very knowledgeable about.  People want information from experts, not random thoughts from the Average Joe.
  33. Make it personal by including a question, scenario, or situation where your reader could insert themselves.

Writing quality web content is so much more than reading a Wikipedia page to familiarize yourself with a topic and then rephrasing it to avoid duplication.  Too many people tout themselves as “professional writers” when they actually are not, and just because someone has a blog doesn’t mean they know what they are talking about (myself included!).